Data Transformation with Transform

Understand how to achieve data transformation with operations supported by webMethods.io Integration.

The transform feature lets you perform various operations on the input data in order to help you customize your workflow output or the data you send to the next action. This feature is available in all actions supported by webMethods.io Integration.

How it Works

Before we understand how each transform operation works, let’s first glance through the procedure of adding the transform operation to your workflow.

You can apply a transform operation on any trigger or action input data. Let’s understand this with the help of an example. Let’s say you want to fetch all cards from a Trello board and then split the result into three chunks.

Note: All actions containing the Transform operation will have the icon. This will eliminate the need for you to open the action and check whether an action contains a Transform operation or not.

  1. Add and configure the relevant trigger/action as you would normally do. For the purpose of this example, we will add the Trello connector to canvas, select the Get Board Cards action, and configure it.

  2. Add the next connector to canvas and select the relevant action. For our example, we will add the Send an Email action.

    When you navigate to the action configuration window, you can see the output of the last action (and/or trigger) along with the Transform option.

  3. Click on the drop-down icon given beside the Transform menu and click the Add New button.

  4. This will open the Add New Transform Data window from where you can apply the transform operation on the specific data. To do so, add the following details in the configuration form that appears:

    • Transform Name: Provide a suitable name for the transform operation you want to apply.

    • Transform Data: Select the relevant transform operation you want to apply. For our example, we will select Chunk.

  5. Once you have selected the operation, click Done. The transform operation configuration window will appear in the same screen where you can see the input fields required to apply the selected transform operation.

    Provide relevant values in the input fields. Since we want to split the given array of cards into three chunks, we will add cards array as input for Array field and 3 as input for the Size field.

    This will take you back to the Send an Email action configuration window.

    Now if you click on the Transform option, you will see the name of the transform operation you created, along with its output. You can pass this output to the next actions in your workflow.

    Once you have entered the required details, click Next, optionally Test the action, and then click Done to return to canvas.

  6. Configure the rest of the workflow as per your requirements and then click Save.

    Now whenever you run this workflow, it will fetch all cards from the specified board of your Trello account, split them sequentially in three chunks, and send it to the specified recipient through email.

    Similarly, you can apply any of the transform operations on your data to achieve data transformation.

Supported Transform Operations

Given below is the list of supported transform operations:

Array Operations

Here’s the list of supported Array operations:

Chunk:

This operation lets you split the given array into specific number of chunks.

Inputs Fields

Array: Source array of which elements you want to split into chunks. Size (optional): Number of chunks you want to split the array into.

Example: If you have an array containing 10 elements and you specify the size as 4, it will sequentially distribute the array elements in 4 chunks. So, the first 3 chunks will contain 3 elements and the last chunk will contain 1 element.

Filter:

This operation lets you filter out only specific elements of the given array based on the specified condition(s).

Input Fields

Note: If you add multiple filters, then all of them will be checked against each array element and only array elements satisfying all filter conditions will be fetched and added to the transform output.

Index Of:

This operation lets you get the index of the first occurrence of the specified value in the given array (traversal is left-right). If the specified item doesn’t exist in the array, it returns -1 as the output.

Input Fields

Array: Source array containing the element of which index you want to fetch.

Item: Value of which index you want to fetch.

Key (optional): If you have specified array of objects in the Array field, enter the key for the specified value here.

Example: If you specify 12345 as the item, it will check the specified array for the first occurrence of the key containing the value as 12345 starting the search from the 0th index. As soon as it is found, the index of that item will be fetched and returned in the result.

Is Array:

This operation lets you get check whether the given input is an array or not. If its array it will return true, otherwise it will return false.

Input Fields

Array: Source array you want to check.

Example: If you enter a valid array in the array field, it will return true in the response.

Join:

This operation lets you join some or all elements of given array with the specified separator.

Input Fields

Array: Source array of which elements you want to join.

Join By: Separator you want to use to join the array elements. For example, ~, #, * and so on.

Join Last Item By (optional): Separator you want to use to join the second last and last element of the array. For example, ~, #, * and so on.

Key (optional): If you have passed array of objects in the Array field, provide the specific key of which values you want to join using the specified separator.

Example: If your array is [{“id”: “123”, “name”: “John”}, {“id”: “456”, “name”: “Sansa”}, {“id”: “789”, “name”: “Arya”}], and you specify ~ as separator in the Join By field, you will get, {“id”: “123”, “name”: “John”}~{“id”: “456”, “name”: “Sansa”}~{“id”: “789”, “name”: “Arya”} in the output. If you enter % as separator in the Join Last Item By field, you will get {“id”: “123”, “name”: “John”}~{“id”: “456”, “name”: “Sansa”}%{“id”: “789”, “name”: “Arya”} in the output. If you enter id in the key field, you will get 123~456%789 in the output.

Last Index Of:

This operation lets you get the index of the first occurrence of the specified value in the given array (traversal is right-left). If the specified item doesn’t exist in the array, it returns -1 as the output.

Input Fields

Array: Source array containing the element of which index you want to fetch.

Item: Value of which index you want to fetch.

Key (optional): If you have specified array of objects in the Array field, enter the key for the specified value here.

Example: If you specify 12345 as the item, it will check the specified array for the first occurrence of the key containing the value as 12345, starting the search from the last element of the array. So, if the value 12345 occurs 2 times in the array, say at 1st and 6th position, the Last Index Of operation output will return 6 in the response.

Merge:

This operation lets you merge two or more arrays.

Input Fields

Arrays: Click the + button to provide the arrays you want to merge.

Array: Array you want to merge with the rest of the arrays.

Example: If you have two arrays, [1,2,3,4] and [5,6,7,8], the merge operation output will be [1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8].

Pick:

This operation lets you pick certain properties from the given array.

Input Fields

Array: Array from which you want to pick specific properties.

Property: The key of which value you want to pick from the given array. You can specify multiple keys by clicking the + button given under the Property label.

Example: If [{“id”: “123”, “name”: “John”, “City”: “Winterfell”}, {“id”: “456”, “name”: “Sansa”, “City”: “Westeros”}] is the array, and you specify id and name in the property fields, you will get [{“id”: “123”, “name”: “John”}, {“id”: “456”, “name”: “Sansa”}] as the output of the Pick operation.

Pop:

This operation lets you remove the last element from the given array. It provides two keys in the output:

output: Returns the array after removing the last array element

removedElement: Returns the last element removed from the array

Input Fields

Array: Array from which you want to remove the last element.

Example: If [1,2,3,4,5] is the given array, the output key will return [1,2,3,4] and the removeElement key will return 5.

Push:

This operation lets you push one or more elements to an existing array.

Input Fields

Array: Array to which you want to push to the element. This element will be pushed at the end of the existing array.

Item: The item you want to add to the array.

Item Type: The type of the specified item. Ensure that the item type matches the item specified, otherwise the workflow will throw an error.

Example: If [1,2,3,4,5] is the given array and you add demo string as an item, the Push operation output will return [1,2,3,4,5,“demo”].

Remove:

This operation lets you remove the specified element from an array.

Input Fields

Array: Array from which you want to remove the element.

Remove by: Specify the method you want to use to remove the element. There are two options:

Index: Specify the index of the element you want to remove.

Item: Specify the item you want to remove from the array.

Example: If [1,2,3,4,5] is the given array and you specify 2 as the index, the Remove operation output will return [3].

Reverse:

This operation lets you reverse the elements of the given array.

Input Fields

Array: Array of which elements you want to reverse.

Example: If [1,2,3,4,5] is the given array, the Reverse operation output will return [5,4,3,2,1].

Size:

This operation lets you retrieve the size of the given array.

Input Fields

Array: Array of which size you want to retrieve.

Example: If [1,2,3,4,5] is the given array, the Size operation output will return 5.

Splice:

This operation lets you remove one or specified number of sequential elements from the given array.

Input Fields

Array: Array from which you want to remove one or more elements.

Start Index: Index of the element you want to remove. If you want to remove more than one element from the array, specify the index from which you want to start removing elements.

End Index: If you want to remove more than one element from the array, specify the index till which you want to continue the splice operation.

Example: If [1,2,3,4,5] is the given array, and you specify 3 as the Start Index, the Splice operation output key will return [1,2,3,5] and the spliced key will return [4].

If [1,2,3,4,5] is the given array, and you specify 1 as the Start Index and 3 as the End Index, the Splice operation output key will return [1,4,5] and the spliced key will return [2,3].

Custom

Here are the operations associated with Custom:

Node.js:

This operation lets you write a node.js code block to apply custom logic on your input data. In addition, it comes preloaded with a set of helper functions that eases the process of writing the code.

Input Fields

Console: Write Node.js code in the provided console window.

Supported Helper Functions:

Helpers, as the name suggests, help you with tasks. Their sole purpose is to ‘help’ a single function by cleaning the code and making the logic clearer. Helper functions are often very concrete as each one is used in a small section of the code. The various helper functions available for usage within the code action are listed below:

  1. $require(‘lib name’):

    Node.Js follows the CommonJS module system, and the built-in ‘require’ function is the easiest way to include modules that exist in separate files. The basic functionality of require is that it reads a JavaScript file, executes it, and then proceeds to return the export objects. In order to include any library inside the code, $require helper should be used. It is a wrapper around the native required() in Node.Js.
    The following libraries can be used in your code:

    aws-sdk

    jade

    q

    request

    rest

    underscore

    uuid

    built

    built.io

    googleapis

    redis

    mongodb

    lodash

    events

    crypto

    path

    querystring

    url

    xlsx

    moment

    soap

    moment-timezone

    htmlparser2

    async

    pubnub

    pusher

    metatags

    htmlencode

    buffer

    events

    http

    http

    https

    punycode

    string_decoder

    assert

    xml2js

    ical-toolkit

    postmark

    nodemailer-smtp-transport

    zlib

    ws

    dynamics-crm-xrm

    edgegrid

    csvtojson

    mime

    node-uuid

    hdb

    netlify

    deep-diff

    cheerio

    x12

    openpgp

    text-encoding

    firebase-admin

    turndown

    syslog-client

    If you require any other libraries, kindly contact us.

  2. $store: The key value ‘store’ is available for storing key-value pairs during workflow execution. It acts like a data store. The data stored is persistent.

    2.1. $store.set(key,value,callback)

    This method is used to set key-value pair. It is important to note that the ‘key’ should be of string data type, while the ‘value’ can be either json, string, or number.

    Example:

    $store.set(“abc”, ”hello”, function(err){
    if(!err){
    $log(‘done’);
    }
    });

    This will set “abc” key with value “hello”.

    2.2 $store.get(key,callback)

    This method is used to retrieve the value of the key stored in $store.

    Example:

    $store.set(“abc”, ”efg”, function(err){
    if(!err){
    // sets “abc” = ”efg”
    $store.get(“abc”, function(err, data){
    // $log(data);
    });
    }
    });

  3. Account Store ($accountStore)

    The key value ‘accountStore’ is available for storing key-value pairs during workflow execution. It acts like a data store. The data stored is persistent.

    The only difference between Account Store and Workflow Store is that Workflow Store ($store) stores data of a particular workflow Id, so all workflows can get data only set by itself, while Account Store ($accountStore), on the other hand, stores data of a particular account or a user, so it is not tied to any particular workflow. Hence, by using Account Store ($accountStore), any workflow can get data set by other workflows in same user account.

    3.1 $accountStore.set (key, value, callback)

    This method is used to set key-value pair. It is important to note that the ‘key’ should be of string data type, while the ‘value’ can be either json, string, or number.

    Example:

    $accountStore.set(“abc”, ”hello”, function(err){
    if(!err){
    $log(‘done’);
    }
    });
    This will set “abc” key with the value “hello”

    3.2 $accountStore.get ( key, callback)

    This method is used to retrieve the value of the key stored in $accountStore.

    Example: $accountStore.set(“abc”, ”efg”, function(err){
    if(!err){
    // sets “abc” = ”efg”
    $store.get(“abc”, function(err, data){
    // $log(data);
    });
    }
    });

  4. Memory Store ($memoryStore)

    The Memory Store action lets you store and retrieve one or more key-value pairs which is limited to only a single workflow run. This means that the keys stored inside a workflow using Memory Store remain active for only one execution. On the subsequent execution of the same workflow, you cannot retrieve the keys stored in the previous execution.

    4.1. $memoryStore.set(key,value,callback)

    This method is used to set a key-value pair. It is important to note that the ‘key’ should be of string data type, while the ‘value’ can be either string or object.

    Example:

    $memoryStore.set(“mem_store_1”, “Hello”, function(err, data){
    $export(null, data);
    });

    This will set the value for ‘mem_store_1’ key to ‘Hello’.

    4.2 $smemoryStore.get(key,callback)

    This method is used to retrieve the value of the key stored in $memoryStore.

    Example:

    $memoryStore.get(“mem_store_1”, function(err, data) {
    $export(null, data);
    });

    This will get the value of the ‘mem_store_1’ key.

  5. $http.get(options)

    This is used to perform http get request. It returns a promise. Options should have the following structure:

    var options = { url : url, qs : qs, headers : headers}

    url – fully qualified uri or a parsed url object from url.parse()

    qs – object containing querystring values to be appended to the uri

    headers – http headers (default: {})

    Example:

    $http.get({url : “http://www.google.co.in”})
    .then(function(data){
    // data
    }).fail(function(err){
    // http call failed see err
    });

  6. $http.post(options)

    This helper function can be used to perform http post request. It returns a promise. Options should have the following structure:

    var options = { url : url, qs : qs, headers : headers,data:data }

    url – fully qualified uri or a parsed url object from url.parse()

    qs – object containing querystring values to be appended to the uri

    headers – http headers (default: {})

    data – entity body for PATCH, POST and PUT requests. It must be a JSON-serializable object or String

    Example:

    $http.post({ url : “http://www.google.co.in”,
    data : {name: “John”, location : “New York”}
    }).then(function(data){
    // data
    }).fail(function(err){
    // http call failed see err
    });

  7. $http.put(options)

    It is used to perform http put request. It returns a promise. Options should have the following structure:

    var options = { url : url, qs : qs, headers : headers,data:data }

    url – Fully qualified uri or a parsed url object from url.parse()

    qs – object containing querystring values to be appended to the uri

    headers – http headers (default: {})

    data – entity body for PATCH, POST and PUT requests. It must be a JSON-serializable object or String

    Example:

    $http.put({ url : “http://www.google.co.in”,
    data : {name: “Jenny”, location : “New York”}
    }).then(function(data){
    // data
    }).fail(function(err){
    // http call failed see err
    });

  8. $http.del(options)

    Use this helprf unction to perform http put request. It returns a promise. Options should have the following structure:

    var options = { url : url, qs : qs, headers : headers,data:data }

    url – fully qualified uri or a parsed url object from url.parse()

    qs – object containing querystring values to be appended to the uri

    headers – http headers (default: {})

    data – entity body for PATCH, POST and PUT requests. It must be a JSON-serializable object or String

    Example:

    $http.del({ url : “http://www.google.co.in”,
    data : {name: “John”, location : “New York”}
    }).then(function(data){
    // data
    }).fail(function(err){
    // http call failed see err
    });

  9. $export(err, output)

    This helper function is used to return control from code action. “err” parameter indicates whether the action has returned an error, while the “output” parameter indicates if it has returned an output. “err” and “output” must be a JSON-serializable object or String.

    if err = null, action successfully completed.

    if err != null, action has error.

    Example:

    for error $export(error);

    for output data $export(null, data);

  10. $success(output)

    This helper function is used to return control from the code action and tell the system that there was no error. The“output” parameter returns the output. “output” must be a JSON-serializable object or String.

  11. $error(err)

    It is used to return control from code action and tell the system that there was error during the execution. “err” parameter returns an error. “err” must be a JSON-serializable object or String.

  12. $log $log(data)

    This helper function is used to add logs, in particular, workflow bill logs. The only difference between $log() and $log() is that $og() logs data after the action is completed, i.e, after $export() is called, while $log() logs data immediately.

    Example:

    $log(data);

  13. Timers

    For more info on Timers, read more on javascript setTimeout, setInterval, clearTimeout and clearInterval.

    var timeoutId = $setTimeout(function, milliseconds);
    var intervalId = $setInterval(function, milliseconds);
    $clearTimeout(timeoutId);
    $clearInterval(intervalId);

  14. $setFlowStatus(“failed”, any error string or object)

    This helper function is used to set the workflow execution status to ‘failed.’ is an optional parameter using which you can pass an error message string or object you want to display when the workflow fails.

    Example:
    this.$setFlowStatus(“failed”, Some error occured);

Date

Here are the operations associated with Date:

Calculate Date Difference

This operation lets you calculate the difference between two given dates.

Input Field

Start Date Pattern: Date format associated with the start date.

Start Date: Start date from which you want to start calculating the difference.

End Date Pattern: Date format associated with the end date.

End Date: End date till which you want to continue calculating the difference.

Example If the Start Date Pattern is YYYY-MM-DD, the Start Date is 2019-06-05, the End Date Pattern is YYYY-MM-DD, and the End Date is 2019-07-05, the Calculate Date Difference operation dateDifferenceSeconds key will return 2592000, dateDifferenceMinutes key will return 43200, dateDifferenceHours key will return 720, dateDifferenceDays key will return 30, dateDifferenceMonths key will return 1, dateDifferenceYears key will return 0.

Compare Dates

This operation lets you compare dates to check whether they are the same or not.

Input Field

Start Date Pattern: Date format associated with the start date.

Start Date: Start date from you want to compare

End Date Pattern: Date format associated with the end date.

End Date: End date you want to compare.

Example If you specify 2019-06-05 as the Start Date and 2019-07-05 as the End Date, the Date Compare output will return -1. If you specify 2019-06-05 as the Start Date and 2019-06-05 as the End Date, the Date Compare output will return 0.

Current Milliseconds

This operation lets you fetch the number of milliseconds for the current time.

No input fields

Date Build

This operation lets you create a date in the specified format.

Input Fields

Year: Enter the year for the date you want to create in the YYYY format. It must be less than or equal to 9999.

Month: Enter the month for the date you want to create in the MM format. It must be less than or equal to 12.

Day: Enter the year for the date you want to create in the DD format.

Date Pattern: Specify the date format for the specified date.

Locale: Specify the locale for the date.

Timezone: Specify the timezone for the date. Default timezone is GMT.

Example If you specify the Year as 2019, Month as 07, and Day as 24, the Date Build output will return 2019-05-24T00:00:00Z.

Date Time Build

This operation lets you create a date (along with time) in the specified format.

Input Fields

Year: Enter the year for the date you want to create in the YYYY format. It must be less than or equal to 9999.

Month: Enter the month for the date you want to create in the MM format. It must be less than or equal to 12.

Day: Enter the year for the date you want to create in the DD format.

Hour: Enter the hour for the time you want to create in the HH format. It must be less than or equal to 24.

Minute: Enter the minute for the time you want to create in the MM format. It must be less than or equal to 60.

Second: Enter the second for the time you want to create in the SS format. It must be less than or equal to 60.

Millisecond: Enter the millisecond for the time you want to create in the SSS format. It must be less than or equal to 999.

Date Pattern: Specify the date format for the specified date.

Locale: Specify the locale for the date.

Timezone: Specify the timezone for the date. Default timezone is GMT.

Example If you specify the Year as 2019, Month as 07, and Day as 24, Hour as 09, Minute as 45, Second 55, Millisecond as 34, the Date Build output will return 2019-07-24T09:45:55Z

Date Time Format

This operation lets you change the format of a given date.

Input Fields

Date: Specify the date of which format you want to change.

Provided Date Pattern: Specify the date format for the specified date.

Locale: Specify the locale for the date.

New Pattern: Specify the date pattern you want to convert the date to.

Example If the given date is 2019-07-08 and you specify the New Pattern as YY-MM-DD, then the Date Time Format operation will return 19-07-08.

Elapsed Milliseconds

This operation lets you retrieve the number of milliseconds that have elapsed since the given time (in milliseconds).

Input Fields

Milliseconds: The time (in milliseconds) from which you want to calculate the elapsed milliseconds.

Example: If the given Milliseconds value is 999999, the Elapsed Milliseconds operation output will return 1562563942577 in the Milliseconds key, 1562563942 in the Seconds key, 26042732 in the Minutes key, 434045 in the Hours key, 18085 in the Days key, 594 in the Months key, and 49 in the Years key.

Get Current Date String

This operation lets you fetch the current date in the specified format.

Input Fields

Pattern: Specify the format in which you want to fetch the current date.

Locale: Specify the locale for the date.

Timezone: Specify the time zone for the date.

Example: If the current date is 8th July 2019, and you specify YYYY-MM-DD as the pattern, the Get Current Date String operation output will return 2019-07-08.

Increment Date

This operation lets you add time to the specified date.

Input Fields

Start Date: Specify the date to which you want to add time.

Pattern: Specify the pattern for the specified date.

Add Years: Number of years you want to add to the specified date.

Month: Number of months you want to add to the specified date.

Day: Number of days you want to add to the specified date.

Hour: Number of hours you want to add to the specified date.

Minute: Number of minutes you want to add to the specified date.

Second: Number of seconds you want to add to the specified date.

Millisecond: Number of milliseconds you want to add to the specified date.

Locale: Specify the locale for the date.

Timezone: Specify the timezone for the date.

Example: If you specify Start Date as 2019-07-08, Pattern as YYYY-MM-DD, Add Years as 2, Add Months as 4, Add Days as 30, Add Hours as 10, Add Minutes as 40, and Add Seconds as 50, the Increment Date operation output will return 2021-12-08T10:40:50.000+00:00.

Convert date to ISO format

This operation lets you convert the specified date to the ISO format.

Input Fields Date: Specify the date you want to convert to ISO format.

Pattern (optional): The pattern for the specified date.

Locale (optional): Specify the locale for the date.

Timezone (optional): Specify the timezone for the date.

Example: If you specify the Date as 2019-07-08, the Convert date to ISO will return 2019-07-08T00:00:00Z.

JSON

Here’s the list of supported JSON operations:

Parse

This operation lets you parse the given object.

Input Field

Stringified Object: The stringified object you want to parse.

Stringify

This operation lets you stringify the given object.

Input Field

Object: The object you want to stringify.

Math

Here are the supported Math operations:

Absolute

This operation lets you fetch the absolute value of the given number.

Input Field

Number: The number of which absolute value you want to fetch.

Example If the given number is -4, the Absolute operation will return 4.

Division

This operation lets you fetch the result of the division of two numbers.

Input Field

Number 1: The number to be divided.

Number 2: The number to be divided by

Precision: Specify the decimal precisions for float values.

Example If Number 1 is 200, Number 2 is 3, and Precision is 4, the Division operation will return 66.6667.

Max

This operation lets you fetch the largest element from the given array.

Input Field

Numbers Array: The number array from which you want to fetch the largest element.

Example If Number Array is [1,2,3,4,5], the Max operation will return 5.

Min

This operation lets you fetch the smallest element from the given array.

Input Field

Numbers Array: The number array from which you want to fetch the smallest element.

Example If Number Array is [1,2,3,4,5], the Min operation will return 1.

Multiply

This operation lets you multiply two or more numbers.

Input Field

Number: Numbers you want to multiply. Click on + button to add more numbers.

Precision: Specify the decimal precisions for float values.

Example If 1st Number is 3.5, second number is 7.6, and the third number is 99.45, the Multiply operation will return 2645.370.

Multiply List Values

This operation lets you multiply all elements of the given array.

Input Field

Numbers Array: The number array of which elements you want to multiply.

Precision: Specify the decimal precisions for float values.

Example If the Number Array is [1,2,3,4,5], the Multiply List Values operation will return 120.00.

Random

This operation lets you generate a random number.

Input Fields

Minimum Limit (optional): The lower limit for the range between which the random number should lie.

Maximum Limit (optional): The upper limit for the range between which the random number should lie.

Precision (optional): The decimal precisions for float values.

Round Number

This operation lets you round off the specified number.

Input Fields

Number: Number you want to round off.

Precision: The decimal precision to round off the number.

Rounding Modes: Direction mode for rounding off the number.

Example If you specify the Number as 12.25 and rounding mode as down, the Round Number operation will return 12.

Subtract

This operation lets you subtract two numbers.

Input Fields

Number 1: First number for subtraction operation.

Number 2: Second number for subtraction operation.

Precision: The decimal precision for float values.

Example If you specify Number 1 as 10 and Number 2 as 5, the Subtract operation will return 5.

Sum

This operation lets you add two or more numbers.

Input Fields

Number 1: First number for add operation.

Number 2: Second number for add operation.

If you want do addition of more than two numbers, click on the + button to add another Number field.

Precision: The decimal precision for float values.

Example If you specify Number 1 as 10 and Number 2 as 5, the Sum operation will return 15.

Sum List Values

This operation lets you fetch the sum of all elements of the given array.

Input Fields

Numbers Array: Array of which elements you want to add.

Precision: The decimal precision for float values.

Example If the given array is [1,2,3,4,5], the Sum List Values operation will return 15.

Object

Here’s the list of supported Object operations:

Contains Key

This operation lets you check whether the specified key is present in the given object.

Input Fields

Object: Object in which you want to check.

Key: Key you want to check against the given object.

Example

If the given object is {“Name”:“John”, “City: “Winterfell”, “Age”:“10”} and key is Name, the Contains Key operation will return true.

Create Object

This operation lets you create an object containing specific key-value pairs.

Input Fields

Add Fields: List of key-value pairs you want to add to the object. Click on the + button given below the Add Fields label to add the key value pairs.

Get

Input Fields

Object: Object from which you want to fetch the value of a key.

Key: Key of which value you want to fetch.

Example

If the given object is {“Name”:“John”, “City: “Winterfell”, “Age”:“10”} and key is Name, the Get operation will return John.

List Keys

This operation lets you fetch the keys of the specified object.

Input Fields

Object: Object from which you want to fetch the keys.

Example

If the given object is {“Name”:“John”, “City: “Winterfell”, “Age”:“10”}, the List Keys operation will return [“Name”,“City”,“Age”].

Put

This operation lets you insert a key-value pair in the specified object.

Input Fields

Object: Object in which you want to insert a key-value pair.

Key: The key you want to insert in the object.

Value: The value for key to be inserted in the object.

Example

If the given object is {“Name”:“John”, “City: “Winterfell”}, the key is Age, and value is 10 the put operation will return {“Name”:“John”, “City: “Winterfell”, “age”:“10”}.

Remove

This operation lets you remove an item from the given object.

Input Fields

Object: Object from which you want to remove a key-value pair.

Key: The key you want to remove from the object.

Example

If the given object is {“Name”:“John”, “City: “Winterfell”} and the key is Name, the Remove operation will return {“City: “Winterfell”}.

Size

This operation lets you get the size of the given object.

Input Fields

Object: Object of which size you want to get.

Example

If the given object is {“Name”:“John”, “City: “Winterfell”} the Size operation will return 2 .

Util

Here are the operations associated with Util:

Generate UUID

This operation lets you generate a UUID.

Get Data Type

This operation lets you fetch the data type of the given item.

Input Fields

Item: The item of which data type you want to retrieve.

Example If you specify Item as 10, the Get Data Type operation will return Number.